The Birth of Silicon Valley

Silicon ValleySilicon Valley, you can’t find a zip code for it, there is no city called Silicon Valley, rather it is a region born from the loins of technology and has grown into a beautiful booming advanced tech industrial area. The nomenclature began in 1971 created by Don Hoefler, an American journalist and friend of Ralph Vaerst, a local entrepreneur. Electronic News http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_News published a series entitled: Silicon Valley in the USA, hence began the widespread use of the term.

The fertile ground was home to apricot orchards, other fruit and nut trees and plants thereby earning the name, Valley of Hearts’ Delight, a name given by John Muir. This area was fertile, lush and produced not just bushels or pounds but tons of produce, many shipped internationally. Canneries and drying sheds entered the region looking to further expand business by stabilizing the produce and increasing shelf life. Global events such as, the Great Depression, WWII and the Korean War changed the face of this blossoming area of agriculture. Until the 1960’s it was the largest fruit production and packing region in the world with 39 canneries.

Veterans from the wars returned to find land prices significantly increased and the government refused to pay for the land at the inflated prices. Vets were forced to find other avenues of gainful employment, hence canneries and drying sheds. Innovation began to blossom in the region. Manufacturing, defense and the birth of the Internet began to shape the sprawling orchards and the news spread like wildfire, there was a new kind of money to be had, all from the high-tech industry.

Silicon Valley is home to these top 10 public tech companies:

1.) Apple: Boasting nearly $200 million in sales, employing nearly 100,000 and paying over $15 million in taxes to the region, Apple takes the lead by a long shot as the top player of the region.

2.) Hewlett-Packard: Another major player of the area, HP sales are over $110 million, employing 302,000 and paying $1.5 million in taxes.

3.) Google: The strongest, largest and most popular search engine has over $66 million in sales, employs nearly 54,000 and pays over $3 million in taxes.

4.) Intel: Nearly $56 million in sales, Intel works hard at powering your latest devices and provides security and ease while you are using the cloud. They employ 106,700 and pay $4 million in taxes each year.

5.) Cisco Systems: $48 million in sales, 74,000 employees and $2 million in taxes all while building the Internet of Everything.

6.) Oracle: Hardware and software engineered to work together gets you nearly $39 million in sales, 122,000 employees and nearly $3 million in taxes.

7.) Gilead Sciences: Gilead’s portfolio includes investigational treatments for HIV/AIDS, liver diseases, cancer, inflammatory and respiratory diseases and cardiovascular conditions. It also includes nearly $25 million in sales, 7,000 employees and nearly $3 million in paid taxes.

8.) eBay: Where else can one sell not only their most common pair of jeans but also the most obscure figurine handed down to you by your late aunt? Nearly $18 million in sales, 34,600 employees and $3.5 million in taxes.

9.) Synnex: According to them, they are the leading business process services company with sales in the $14 million range, 59,000 employees and $104,000 in taxes paid.

10.) Facebook: The stolen gift to the Internet. $12 million in sales, nearly 10,000 employed and $1.9 million in paid taxes.

The landscape has changed, so have the fruits of labor yet the Valley of Hearts’ Delight of yesterday, the Silicon Valley of today and something even grander of tomorrow is what can be expected of this great region.

2018-05-07T20:41:01+00:00May 21st, 2015|News|